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CAMPAIGN 2001

This year's campaign is scheduled for July 3-28, 2001. We will be leaving on July 3rd. Ted will be leaving from Tampa and Bill Dillon and others will be leaving from Atlanta. We will meet up in London and then fly on into Ghana on Wednesday, July 4th.

ted

From the airport Ted will travel to Tema and Bill will be going to Nsawam. Thursday (5th) through Sunday (8th) Ted will be staying in Tema and working with the Accra Road church of Christ and Bill will be holding a gospel meeting in Nsawam.. Each morning at 5:30 am Ted and Paul Addo will be doing a live radio broadcast on Adom FM-Tema's only FM station. The radio program is normally broadcast weekly; but we are going to conduct a number of extra programs during our visit. (See Paul's report on page 3.) Last year, at the end of our broadcasting, we were interviewed by the radio station at which time they asked us a lot of questions about the church and the work that is being done throughout the country. We hope that the program will be the same this year.

baptismOn Monday (9th), Bill will be leaving with a group for Takoradi where they will conducting the annual lectureship at the West Coast School of Preaching. At the same time, Ted will be leaving with a group for Yendi where they will be spending ten days working with Royce & Cindy Reynolds, Samson Laar and others. From the 10th-20th they will be conducting mobile clinics (see article above); doing evangelistic work in nearby villages and following up on work that they did previously. This year the Venice and Orange Street churches are helping drill well to provide safe drinking water for a village (next issue) and the group also hopes to follow-up on that work.

Sunday (14th) - Wednesday (16th) Bill will be conducting a gospel meeting in Tema and doing the live radio broadcast each morning. Ted will return to Tema on Saturday, 21st. During his last week (Monday, 22nd - Friday 27) he will be working with a number of churches in the Eastern Region, following up on previous work and checking on the progress of several building programs. On the back page there a number of these projects are listed. We are seeking to raise $17,000.00 for the campaign. Some of these monies are needed in the next several weeks-so that they can be forwarded to Ghana ahead of time.

CAMPAIGN 2001 TRAVEL-LOG (latest report on top)
Read from the bottom for a chronological account


July 25, 2001 - 6:00 pm (EST)

Addo's visas approved! By God's grace Paul and Matilda recieved their visas this afternoon. We would like to thank everyone for their prayers.

Yesterday I spoke at the Kpone church of Christ and tonight I spoke at the Haana church (nearby Kpone). We had good attendance each night. Both of these congregations are currently in the process of trying to put up permanent meetings places as they reach out to their communities with the gospel of Christ. Last year with their help and planning we were able to work with them to start a new congregation in the Volta Region. One day we drove to a nearby town which they have targeted for a church planting around the first of the year.

Tomorrow morning I will be interviewed live on Adom FM at 5:30 am (prime time in Ghana - everyone is beginning their day - getting ready for school and work - and most are tuned into the radio). They want to interview me about the church of Christ and the work we are doing in Ghana.

With that my speaking assignments are ended (although you never know when you will be invited to speak somewhere) and I will begin preparing for the flight home. I am glad that Paul and Matilda will be able to accompany me and that many of you will get a chance to meet this fine Christian couple and get a chance to learn more about the work in Ghana.

I will plan on speaking about this year's trip in our Bible class on Sunday morning. I am working on my Sunday morning sermon and will be bringing a message from the life of Nehemiah with a couple points to challenge us in our Christian lives and work. Our text will be Nehemiah 1:1-4. I believe Sunday night will be evening of singing to praise God.

Yesterday I also visited the church at Accra Road and took some pictures of the children that are attending the Ashaiman Christian Centre and the construction that is underway on new facilites for the Centre (K-8). They are getting ready to pour the concrete floor on the second level - it will be a 2-story schoolblock.

If possible I will try and send another update tomorrow or Friday morning and fill in a few of the blanks. I have been trying to take lots of pictures and hopefully I will be able to start getting some of them online soon after I get home. I had problems with one of my cameras for a week or so - but now I have them both up and working.

Please remember our travels in your prayers. God bless. Looking forward to seeing all the Venice folks on Sunday. I heard that the fellowship was moved up to this Sunday to welcome the Addos. That will be nice and I will be ready for some of that good ole Venice homecookin.

Ted


Monday, July 16, 2001

We got up early on Monday morning, had breakfast and then headed to PAGANTIK to conduct the mobile clinic. Another trip down this side of the rocky valley and back up the other rocky side.

We arrived around 7:30 am and when we reached the school where we held services the previous day there were two brothers waithing for us. We were blessed to find another cool breeze blowing under the shade of the trees that surrounded the parking area. The school was in session so we decided to conduct the clinic under the trees.

Around 8:30 am Cindy Reynolds and her son-in-law, Steve, along with some other clinic workers arrived and we set up the clinic. We opened the back off Cindy's covered pick-up and set up the "pharmacy" and then used church benches to set up three lines for patients.

In about 30 minutes people were lining up to be seen. Most were mothers with young children. Many were suffering from malaria, colds, flu, etc. There were also some wounds that needed cleaned and bandaged. We saw a few children that were not getting enough of the proper food to eat and one little girl who was showing definite signs of malnourishment. In additional to treating the people and providing the needed medications - where needed - counseling was provided. The most severe case that I saw was a young 18 year old girl whose left arm had been severely burned by scalding water from her shoulder to her wrist. The injury had occured the day before. Cindy had to peel off the dead skin and clean the burns with antiseptic. The arms were then covered in a burn cream and bandaged. The mother was given the needed medications, ointment and bandages and shown how to take care of the wound. The girl was also given a tetanus injection and antibiotics (a new antibiotic that was donated to our work by Dr. Daryl).

By the end of the day @ 250 people had been treated. The brethren thanked us and gave us some yams and a chicken as a sign of their appreciation. The local chief also sent us a chicken and thanked us for helping his community. (I will leave it to your imagination to guess what happened to the chicken and yams.)

We walked to the chief's house and thank him for his gift and the warm reception of the people. When we got back to the vehicles we discovered that the church sisters had prepared us a meal of Tuozafi - it was good and I will tell you about it when I get home.

We then drove down and back up the rocky valley and called it a day.

God bless.

Ted


Tuesday, July 17, 2001

On Tuesday we drove into "downtown" BUNKPURUGU and filled the van with diesel. This was poured out of a 55 gallon drum into a 5 gallon bucket which in turn was poured through a funnel into the van. I was happy when they pulled out a piece of cheesecloth to strain the fuel before pouring it into the van.

We then went around town and visited with some of the townspeople.

Late in the afternoon we prepared to drive to GBINGBANI and hour and half or so from Bunkpurugu. (Ghana has daylight from around 5:45 am - 6:00 pm) It got dark very quickly, began to shower and the road was very rough and under construction. After dark we soon discovered that the construction involved putting culverts across the road to let rain water flow across during the rainy season (they get very hard rains which cause flashfloods in many areas). The method of putting these culverts in this area is to lay then across the existing road and then box them in with concrete (later they will raise the road in that area - like a small bridge - to drive over the culverts). What that meant for us that we were running along in the rain and the dark in the wonderful "gospel chariot" and all of a sudden there was a concrete wall in front of us with a path to drive around it. The first couple were a surprise and then the next several were just routine.

When we arrived in Gbingbani the sky had cleared and the sky was incredible. The only lights to be seen were kerosine lanterns.

We were informed that a brother Daniel had started the church there and that he had converted a few individuals. Daniel had been to school in Kumasi and was converted there. A couple years ago, his father died and he was called home to take care of family affairs. His family farms rice by hand.

Daniel told us that recent the small meeting place that the church was meeting in was burned by area Muslims. he said that the local chief told the community that they shouldn't do such things. We took the time to meet the chief - he turned out to be a young man (for a chief) well educated and fluent in TWI. He and brother Owusu had a very cordial conversation and he wished us well in our preaching and the for the growth of the church.

The church set up some benches along the roadside and around 8:00 pm we began preaching. We had quite a good audience - but when the invitation was extended - there were no responses. It seemed a bit strange to me and then we found out that just recently many of the people present had been converted and it looked like there were 20 or so who were members.

After the preaching we met at Daniel's home and discussed the work with him. It seems like a denominational church tried to get going in town and failed. After the failure many of the people turned to Islam. Since Daniel's arrival many of those who were first interested in Christianity are now turning to the Lord's church.

Please remember Daniel and the church in your prayers. We arranged to send some money back to help encourage Daniel and the church with the work.

Then was the long drive back to Bunkpurugu dodging culverts and potholes all the way. We were thankful to have brother Owusu-Ansah with us to drive us home safely.

When we reached Bunkpurugu we started some charcoal and had a cup of tea. I was finally able to get a "shower" via my bucket around 12:30 and .......

to be continued.

Ted


Wednesday, July 18, 2001

Bunkpurugu ... 12:30 am

We had just returned from the long hard drive from Gbingbani. I was showered and headed for my tent. Ernest was heading for the shower and brother Owusu was in his pajamas and heading for his bed and .... brrm brrrm - the sound of Yamaha 125 pulling up to our compound. Brother Kwabena from Yendi walked in and said Paul and Matilda had sent word that they were having problems with their visa application and needed me in Accra on Thursday.

So much for heading for my tent, Ernest heading for the shower and Owusu going to bed. We hurriedly packed and set off on the 4 hour drive for Yendi around 1 am. The drive was even more difficult at night. Bro.s Samson and kwabena followed us on their motorbikes. About halfway to Yendi Samson pulled alongside to say that Kwabena had blown his rear tire! We stopped and backed up till we found Kwabena. We opened that side door and picked the bike up and put it in front of the middle seat locked the brakes and front wheel and left the back of the bike hang out the door. Niipak and Kwabena held the bike from the middle seat and I held from the front passenger seat. 2 and 1/2 hours later we arrived in Yendi at 5:30 am. We stopped at Isaac Adotey's house - unloaded the van and the bike and had a cup of tea and sat down for a few minutes.

At 6:30 am Dan Mcvey picked us up and drove us to Yendi. It took about 2 hours and thankfully the road was in pretty good shape and his truck had A/C. We spent about an hour driving around Yendi trying to find transportation to Accra. Finally we settled on a local taxi. Our drivers name was Aziz. We finally set off for Accra around 9:30 am.

Accra is @410 miles from Yendi and most of the road is in pretty good shape. Aziz was a good driver - as taxi drivers go and we made very good time along the way.

We stopped in Kumasi to get fuel and Aziz decided to take a short cut through Kumasi's business center. Mistake! The place was jammed with traffic and before long the local police and driver's union stopped our taxi for an inspection. It turned out that our taxi had no insurance and did not have current registration! This is easily determined by the police by the absence of the proper decals on the windshield. The police threatened to arrest Aziz and impound the taxi. After about 20 minutes of Aziz pleading and paying a fine the police issued a citation and let us go.

After this Aziz's foot became heavier and his driving scoring headed south real fast - almost as fast as the taxi. We cautioned him several times about his speed through towns and also the passing of 3 or 4 vehicles uphill on two lane hills! Most of this fell on deaf ears.

By God's grace we finally reached Accra and there we told him we needed to go to Tema. At first he was reluctant but finally we convinced him that he could drive us the 11 miles to Tema on the motorway much faster than he could fight traffic to downtown Accra. We also told him we would pay him additional for the extra miles.

We arrived at Ernest's house around 6:30 pm. Yendi to Tema in about 9 hours. Excellent time - but I don't think I would want to do it over again. Nearly 42 hours without sleep or a decent meal! We found something to eat, grabbed a hot shower (a real shower) and then went to bed.

Paul and Matilda would be picking me up the next morning at 6 am to go to the Consulate.

Thanks for your prayers.

Ted


Thursday, July 19, 2001

Ernest and I got up at 5 am and had a cup of coffee before Paul and Matilda picked us up at 6 am to go to the Consulate in Accra.

Even though their appointment was at 11 am they were required to be there at 7 am (?!?!?!?) They finally started seeing people around 7:30 am and at around 11 am they told a whole group of people including the Addos to come back on the 26th without even talking to them. I went upstairs to the American section of the Consulate and asked for some assistance and was told to see one of the officers downstairs.

I finally got to speak to him and basically he told me there was nothing he could do - we talked for some time and finally he gave me an appointment date for the Addos for Monday, 23rd. I thought that was a good sign.

I will jump now to today - the 23rd - we spent 6 hours at the Consulate and they were treated the same way and told to come on Weds - 25th. I again went upstairs and this time I talked to the same officer who was not real happy to see. He told me there was nothing that could be done for they were overloaded with people wanting visas. (They are "processing" about 300 people per day.) I did get him to write an appointment date for Weds at 8 am on the Addo's application (this was not done downstairs) and he said that he was hopeful that on Wednesday they would have the time to take care of all the applicants.

This whole process has been very discouraging for the Addos and especially after today - even for myself. Matilda said she thought it would be easier for one to get into heaven than get a visa from the American Embassy! I certainly believe that will be the case for this fine Christian couple. Please keep them in your prayers on Wednesday as they go for their 6 "visit" to the U.S. Consulate.

We got home just before dark. Ernest needed to have his car serviced and while he did that bro. Owusu and I did that. We were all happy we had a cup of coffee in the morning - but again - another day of running on empty.

Tomorrow I will be visiting Kpone and preaching for the church in the evening. I will try and catch up on the trip tomorrow evening and pick up with the follow-up visit to the villages where the wells were drilled. A number of people expressed a desire to be baptized and just as they reached the waterside ......

Tune in tomorrow for the conclusion of this story.

God bless. Looking forward to being with my brothers an sisters and family this Lord's Day.

Ted


Friday- Saturday, July 20 - 21, 2002 - 5:11 pm (EST)

I am now back in Tema with electricty, telephones and running water! Boy did that first warm shower feel good. Ernest, Owusu and I are in good health and as usual we have been doing our fair share of eating at every meal. We have been eating a lot of local foods and got to try some new meals that I have never eaten before.

We left for the North and Yendi as scheduled on Wednesday, July 11th. Nat Adams was nice enough to drive us up to Yendi. He is the director of the well drilling teams. We made very good time, stopping only at filling stations for fuel, a soft drink and whatever we could find to snack on. For those of you who know of our famous turkey-tail stops at Nsawam - believe it or not - I passed on the turkey tails this trip. This weekend we will be driving to the Eastern Region and since it is a long tradition we will stop in Nsawam this time for our fried turkey-tails and loaves of fresh bread. :) The trip to the North took about 13 hours. When we arrived in Yendi - Nat dropped us off at Royce and Cindy Reynolds. Cindy had prepared a big meal for us. After dinner we showered, visited for a couple hours and then Ernest, Owusu and I got to sleep in one of the Reynolds bedrooms (with A/C!).

On Thursday, July 12th, Ernest, Owusu and I drove with Royce and John Kandeoja to the village of Macheliyilu - about a hours drive from Yendi. The road was very rough the last few miles and we got stuck on a big rock that jutted out of the ground (it was a two-track road with grass in the middle - of course the rock was in the grass and unseen). We locked in the four wheel drive and climbed off of it fairly easily. We arrived at the village to meet a number of the church members. A big storm had recently damaged their church building (a traditional mud building with metal roof). It looks like they will loose one of the main walls. We talked about various ways to shore up the wall until the dry season when they can pull the wall down and rebuild. Our main reason for visiting Macheliyilu was the fact that many of the members were without food as they waited for the rains and the harvest that would eventually come in the next month or two. There were 35 widows and orphans in the church as a result of the war five years ago. We provided financially assistance to all of these to help them until the crops came in. As we were about to leave they showed us a house (mud building with thatched roof) that was hit with lightning one night. Fortunately the family, though stunned, were rescued, and have moved in with friends until the house can be rebuilt during the dry season. They do not get much lightning and it was the "talk of the town". We said good bye and then drove back to Yendi. When we reached Yendi, Cindy had dinner ready - including her famous coconut cream pie. We polished off about half of the pie and ate the rest the next morning for breakfast.

This was our first full day in Yendi. We were told that a number of widows and orphans in the church in Macheliyilu were suffering from hunger. The village was about an hours drive from Yendi. We decided to take some funds to the church there to help them buy food until the harvest comes in several weeks from now.

Most of the problem was a result of the war that occured five years ago. Many of the men were killed.

Ernest, Owusu and I left Yendi in the morning with Royce Reynolds and John Kandeoja. Most of the drive was on a fairly good dirt road. The last several miles of the road were very rough. In this area of the north the bedrock juts out of the ground in a number of places. We were driving on a two-track dirt road when we hit a big rock and the vehicle got stuck. Fortunately Royce had a 4 wheel drive vehicle. We locked in the 4 wheel drive and climbed off the rock.

We arrived to meet several of the church members. They immediately began to tell us about a big storm that hit the area. It severely damage the church building - atraditional mud building with a metal roof. We discussed several ways they might shore up a damaged wall til they could pull it down and repair it in the dry season. They also showed us a house that was hit by lightning in the night. Fortunately the people were rescues from the burning house.

We learned that there were 35 widows and orphans and that hunger was a real problem. We left them enough money to help them buy food until they could bring in their harvest.

Afterwards we drove back to Yendi and talked with brethren about the various works that were going on in the North.

Oh, I forgot to tell you on Thursday afternoon Royce sent for a fitter to repair his old van (13 years old). We learned that for the past year or so it was the home to the local chickens - and it would be our source of transportation to Bunkpurugu and beyond. Late in the afternoon we finally heard it start. On Friday we would take it for its first run.

By the way - a fitter is a local auto mechanic.

We got up early on Friday morning and set out to visit the village of Mayefuni where the well was drilled along with 4 other villages. Mayefuni was about an hour from Yendi. This time the road was a little rougher than before and instead of being in a fairly new 4 wheel drive pick-up we were in the old van (loved by chickens) and known locally as the "Gospel Chariot".

When we left Yendi all the brothers on the church property were laughing. Some stopped and shared with us the fact of all the times the chariot left them stranded in far away places. With that news we set out on our journey.

Whenever I use we for the next few days it will include: Ernest Apeadu, Edward Owusu-Ansah, Samson Laar, Niipaak Laar and myself. We again left early in the morning. Before leaving we learned that the auto-glow plugs on teh diesel engine no longer worked and you had to reach under the dash and press a button several times and finally hold as you turned the key to get the engine to start. Once started it ran fine. A noisy smokey diesel.

We soon learned that the clutch was bad and it was nearly impossible to get it into 3rd gear on the 5 speed. There are a lot of hills in the North and we often needed 3rd to climb them; but found too often by the time we struggled to get 3rd the vehicle had slowed so much we had to go back to 1st and start all over. On flat road we could jump from 2nd to 4th - but the jump was too much for hills and the old engine wouldn't pull up the hills in 4th. it was a lot of work.

Our next "revelation" was when bro. Owusu, who was driving, tried to apply the brakes to avoid hitting a big pothole (and believe the pot holes are big in the north!) only to find that the brakes were weak. Owusu would pump like crazy only to have us hit the pothole at full speed - jarring teeth and flinging us all up out of the seats. Occasionally the brakes would grab and slow us so we could avoid hitting the potholes - at those times we learned it pulled hard to the right. other than the brakes and the clutch the vehilce ran find.

Now back to Mayefuni. We arrived to meet a large number of villagers and town leaders. Friday is day that they do not go to their farms. We talked to them about the new well and learned that it is producing 70 gallons of clean water per minute. They are waiting for the concrete apron to be poured and the pump to be installed.

Mayefuni and the other villages are guinea worm endemic. We told them we were going to drive further and visit the other villages along the road and they asked for us to come back and preach Christ to them on our way back to Yendi. We made an appointment to be there around 4 pm and then set off for the next village.

The next village was NIWURANYA. They had a producing well too - 58 gallons per minute. this was the 2nd of 3 wells that were drilled (2 of the villages had dry wells). We visited with the some of the town leaders and then set off for village number 3.

Unfortunately, NAKUNDO had a dry well. We again talked to a number of people and they too invited us back to teach them about Jesus. We gave them a time around 2 pm to come back and preach.

KANBONDO also had a dry well. (Our teams will drill twice in an area and if they do not hit water they will then move on to the next closest village and try again.)

The last village we visited was MAWANGDO. They also had a producing well which they call a borehole. They told us there were 7 people in the village at that time with guinea worm infestations. We saw the foot of man who was recovering from guinea worm and a 7 year old boy who had a worm in his foot. His foot was extremely swollen and the worm was inthe process of coming out of his foot with a few inches of the worm being exposed (they can be 2' or 3' in length!) By God's grace and the help of many good brethren - these places where we have been able to drill good wells should be free from this terrible disease. They asked us to preach too! We told them it was getting late and we had already made two appointments and would arrange to come back the following week and preach to them.

We then drove back to Nakundo and spent about and hour preaching to them about the God's Plan and Man's Problem with Sin. The rural villages are a tight community and they usually don't make decisions quickly. They said they appreciated the message and asked us to come back the following Friday and they would give us their decision on whether they would obey the gospel. Again, Fridays are the only day of the week that they do not go to their farms. Farming is their life and life is very hard. We told them we would come back and keep them in our prayers until that time.

We then drove to Mayefuni and preached for another hour. The response was the same - come back. When we finished two men came from a nearby village and asked us to preach there! By now it was getting dark and we had a big day scheduled on Saturday - so we told them we would come back the following Friday and preach.

We then drove back to Yendi in the dark. It took us about 30 minutes to figure out how to get all the headlights on and keep them on.

We got back to Yendi safely and I arrived to find that Cindy had baked me a coconut cream pie. We ate half of it and then took a shower and got to sleep.

WE got up early on Saturday - loaded the gospel chariot - and headed for BUNKPURUGU - 110 miles NE of Yendi. This is the hometown of bro's Samson & Niipaak Laar. It was a long dusty difficult ride in the van. Along the way we met only 3 other vehicles. it took us a little over 4 hours.

When we arrive we set up camp at a small "motel" that we stayed in two years ago. The landlady was happy to see us again. Two years ago there were no churches - but following our work - in the time since there are now 3 congregations in the immediate area. We rented 3 rooms at $ 1.30 per night! No electricity, no running water - but did occasionaly have solar power with 6 watt bulbs in some of the rooms. The weather was extremely hot. So hot i set up my tent in the courtyard and slept in it the whole time.

Bunkpurugu is about 2 miles from the Togo border. An area green from the summer rains and the crops that were planted - maize, guinea corn, millet and some rice.

Sunday - the Lord's Day.

In the morning we worshipped with the church in PAGNATIIK near the Togo border. You could see the village across the valley from the motel where we were staying.

We were happy to find that the church met in a small school shaded by trees with a nice cool breeze blowing. After a miserably humid hot night it was refeshing to be able to worship and enjoy a cool breeze - truly a gift from God.

there were 33 adults and 17 children present. They sang many many songs. We learned that many of the church members were elderly and sick so we decided to conduct the mobile clinic there the following day.

I forgot the mention the road from the motel to the school. I cannot describe it. i took some pictures and only hope they can show you how rough it was - nothing but boulders and bedrock. Down on side of the valley and up the other. We spent more time going sideways than we did going forward.

We drove back to the motel and had lunch and then drove back across the valley and the rocky road to the village of TOJING. It was a clear night and the sky was incredible -as the psalmist said it declared the glory of God - you could almost reach out and touch the stars. We met outside and used kerosine lanterns for light. The crowd was about twice the size as Sunday morning. At the end of the sermon 13 people confessed faith in Christ. We walked about a mile or mile and a half in the dark down the hillside to a small pond. There was tall grass all around and the bugs were thick. They told us there were crocodiles in the area! I figured with all the people (the whole congregation was there) any critters would be slow to show themselves. We baptized the thirteen and two more visitors confessed Christ and were baptized making 15 in all. We then walked back to where we met for services and had a prayer committing them all to Christ. We informed them of the nearby clinic on Monday and then headed back to the motel. The work with the help of Samson, Niipaak and many other brethren in Ghana along with your prayers and support is beginning to bear much fruit in this area.

Our water supply at the motel was supplied by a cistern which caught the rain from the roof. Sunday night we had a heavy rain that brought a nice breeze and cooler weather. very much welcome. I had to move my tent under an open area with a roof where we did our cooking. We had a shower room and used buckets of rain water and a cup for bathing.

Ted


Saturday, July 21 - 3:56 pm (EST)

Yesterday I sent you the first part of our trip to the North. I spent about an hour typing up the second part only to have the power go off in Tema and have the computer I was using crash - losing all the information I typed. I was so bummed that I decided I would wait til today before I would to try and send any more mail. And I will send shorter updates to avoid losing so much work. Since I have been here we have had intermittent power outages. I will be back later with more updates. We will travel to the Eastern Region tomorrow and worship with the churches in Kade and Adonkrono.

Ted


I am now back in Tema with electricty, telephones and running water! Boy did that first warm shower feel good. Ernest, Owusu and I are in good health and as usual we have been doing our fair share of eating at every meal. We have been eating a lot of local foods and got to try some new meals that I have never eaten before.

We left for the North and Yendi as scheduled on Wednesday, July 11th. Nat Adams was nice enough to drive us up to Yendi. He is the director of the well drilling teams. We made very good time, stopping only at filling stations for fuel, a soft drink and whatever we could find to snack on. For those of you who know of our famous turkey-tail stops at Nsawam - believe it or not - I passed on the turkey tails this trip. )This weekend we will be driving to the Eastern Region and since it is a long tradition we will stop in Nsawam this time for our fried turkey-tails and loaves of fresh bread. :) The trip to the North took about 13 hours. When we arrived in Yendi - Nat dropped us off at Royce and Cindy Reynolds. Cindy had prepared a big meal for us. After dinner we showered, visited for a couple hours and then Ernest, Owusu and I got to sleep in one of the Reynolds bedrooms (with A/C!).

On Thursday, July 12th, Ernest, Owusu and I drove with Royce and John Kandeoja to the village of Macheliyilu - about a hours drive from Yendi. The road was very rough the last few miles and we got stuck on a big rock that jutted out of the ground (it was a two-track road with grass in the middle - of course the rock was in the grass and unseen). We locked in the four wheel drive and climbed off of it fairly easily. We arrived at the village to meet a number of the church members. A big storm had recently damaged their church building (a traditional mud building with metal roof). It looks like they will loose one of the main walls. We talked about various ways to shore up the wall until the dry season when they can pull the wall down and rebuild. Our main reason for visiting Macheliyilu was the fact that many of the members were without food as they waited for the rains and the harvest that would eventually come in the next month or two. There were 35 widows and orphans in the church as a result of the war five years ago. We provided financially assistance to all of these to help them until the crops came in. As we were about to leave they showed us a house (mud building with thatched roof) that was hit with lightning one night. Fortunately the family, though stunned, were rescued, and have moved in with friends until the house can be rebuilt during the dry season. They do not get much lightning and it was the "talk of the town". We said good bye and then drove back to Yendi. When we reached Yendi, Cindy had dinner ready - including her famous coconut cream pie. We polished off about half of the pie and ate the rest the next morning for breakfast.

I will send this message before something crashes and continue shortly.

Ted


Tuesday, July 10 - 6:03pm (EST)

This morning I woke up early and Paul and Matilda picked me up at 7:00 am and we were off to the U.S. Consulate. They had an 8:30 appointment and were finally taken into the waiting room around 10:30. Americans aren't allowed into the Consulate until 9:30 so I waited til then and then entered the area where all the Ghanaians were waiting outside for visas. When they called Paul & Mat into the waiting room (they were calling about 10 people at a time) I managed to slip in. I was the only American in the room. They finally called Paul & Mat to the interview window and I went up and stood with them. They were asked several questions and then the officer took their passports and bank statement and said they were going to check some things out. They asked us to take a seat (plastic stadium seats) and they would call us. We watched @ 150 of the 200 Ghanaians go through the interview process during the day. I left Tema without eating or even drinking a cup of coffee. Finally around 4:30 they called Paul & Mat and said they forgot them! They did apologize; but said they hadn't heard back from an institution (I am sure that it is Paul's bank for that was the only document they took) and that it was important that they verify that the document was real. So Paul & Mat will have to go back on Monday at 11:00 am. Be sure to keep them in your prayers. Getting a U.S. visa is a real ordeal - I will tell you more stories when I get home. Paul said he would call Yendi on Monday and let me know how things turned out. I hope it is not the case; but if need be - I will leave Ernest and Owusu with the work in the North - and drive back to Tema and do whatever I can to help.

As soon as we left the Consulate we found out the battery was dead in the car. So we had to push start the car. Then we drove straight to a Shell station and bought a Red Bull (a carbonated energy drink) and a Mars bar. When we got to Tema we stopped at a small local restaurant that makes a fairly good pizza (for some reason they haven't discovered pizza sauce so they just pile on whatever items are available) for our supper. Our pizza had onions, green pepper, sliced hot dogs (they come canned - definitely not Ballparks) and some kind of cheese. Not Pizza Hut - but after a day without food it hit the spot.

I then went home and packed for the Yendi trip tomorrow. After I packed I was hot and sticky and so I took a shower and waited for Ernest to get home from work. When Ernest got home he packed and then he, Owusu and I went and bought some supplies to take along. We dropped Owusu so he could take a taxi home and get packed himself. Owusu will meet us at Ernest's house around 6:30 and then Nat Adams will pick us up at 7:00 am and we will start on a long hard day. It will probably be 8:00 or 9:00 pm before we reach Yendi. We usually make four stops for fuel and something to drink. 1st stop will be at Nsawam where we will buy fuel, bread and fried turkey tails, 2nd stop - Kumasi for fuel and a soft drink and a meat pie, 3rd stop - Kintampo for fuel and a soft drink and fried yams; 4th stop - Tamale for fuel and a soft drink - then 85 miles to Yendi. Keep us in your prayers for it is a long and hard trip. And in many places the road is not good.

We are at George and Theresa Amuasi's as usual and they have been good to let me use their home and PC. They will get a 10 day reprieve while we are in the North. Lord willing we will be in Bunkpurugu over the weekend. We have a mobile clinic planned there for Saturday. I will try and send an email from Yendi whenever I can. Ernest hasn't had supper so I will have to go find him something to eat. Love and greetings to all. ....Ted


Monday July 9 - 7:28 am (EST)

We had a good weekend. Finished up our meeting at the Accra Road church in Ashaiman on Sunday. We started the morning with the live radio program. Paul picked me up at 5 am and we drove to the radio station. The program runs from 5:30 - 5:55 am. I spoke first and then Paul interpreted the lesson into Twi. Afterwards we went back to Ernest's for coffee. Bible class started at 9:00 am. Worship ran from 10:00 - 12:00 and with announcements and things I didn't get away until around 12:30. Attendance was 300+. At 3:00, Ernest and I went to the Nsoahs for lunch. Lizzie fixed banku (cassava and corn dough) and okra stew with red snapper and smoked wahoo. It was great! At 5:30 pm we left to worship with the Lebanon church in Ashaiman. Some of the original members from Accra Road who were walking a long distance to the meeting place started a new congregation in the area of town called Lebanon. We had 54 in attendance. After services the town was quiet for Ghana was playing Argentina in football (soccer) in the World Youth Finals for the championship. Argentina proved too powerful and they won 3 - nil. We watched the second half of the game at Paul Addo's house. After the game Ernest and I were feeling hungry (we hadn't eaten since 3 pm) and found a fast food place (the only one in Tema) that seemed to specialize in everything. Ernest and I ordered a Coke and a bowl of hot and sour soup which turned out to be quite good. With that we returned to Ernest's house where I took my 2nd hot shower with Ernest's new hot water heater.

This morning I woke up to a number of visitors. Bro. Koranteng, one of the first men that I met and worked with back in 1980 (and for those of you who know a special friend of Archie Chapman) came by to say hello and tell me about the program of the Sebrepor church. Also, Daniel Ababio, a crippled brother, we are helping with education, came by and we discussed his progress and upcoming examines. he is studying to be a CPA. Owusu arrived so that we could take care of some business together. All of them enjoyed the fresh brewed coffee that was one the table. They are only used to instant coffee. They especially liked the scent of the coffee - something that instant doesn't have. When we were finished brother Appiah Sackey and his wife came by to thank me for the money that was sent to help his daughter have the surgery to remove the tumor. He said she is really doing well and is now back in school. A special thanks to all who helped.

Owusu and I just returned from the U.S. Consulate - didn't accomplish very much - I couldn't really get to see the people that I needed to see for Paul and Matilda's visa. There were 300 people waiting for visa interviews! Paul and Matilda have another interview tomorrow and I will go with them. Pray that they have a low number and are called quickly or I could be spending most of my day sitting outside in a crowd. The lady did tell me to tell Paul and Matilda to be persistent. Persistent will be our by-word tomorrow for we are scheduled to depart for Yendi and the North on Wednesday. That is a long hard 13+ hour drive. After the first night in Yendi - I will be out in the small towns and villages (no electricity, etc.) so there will be silence from this end. I will try and send updates whenever I can and should be able to send one while I am actually in Yendi.

George is letting me use his PC again so I am at his house. In about an hour Owusu and I will be heading to the Addo's house for lunch. I am not sure what is going to be on the table; but Matilda is an excellent cook and prepares fufuo (made from boiled cassava and green plantain and then pounded in a ball similar to bread dough.) and a special groundnut soup that she knows I like so I am suspecting that is the meal I will go to meet (as they say in Ghana).

After lunch I will visit the new site and construction of the Ashaiman Christian Centre (school ... K-8).

AOL is getting ready to give the disconnect so I will sign off here.

Charles Salmon and his group arrived safely this morning.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Saturday July 7 - 8:53 am (EST)

Friday afternoon I got to enjoy my first bowl of fufuo with groundnut & goat soup! After lunch Owusu and I drove to Accra to the U.S. Consulate only to find they were closed (half days on Fridays) so I will go back first thing Monday morning. We drove back to Tema and around 4:30 decided to try to take a nap and catch up on some lost sleep. I awoke at 5:40 pm and was scheduled to preach in Ashaiman at 6:00! We made it around 6:08 and thankfully the services hadn't started yet. Last night we studied the fact we can all make a difference for the cause of Christ.

This morning we woke up early and had coffee. Then we had several visitors including Isaac Adjei who arrived from the Eastern Region with the good news that he had baptized the head mistress of a large school and one who has a great influence in that area. We are praying through her conversion many others will come to the Lord.

Isaac and I took Ernest to work and then dropped in and greeted Christian and Lizzie Nsoah, long time friends in Tema. I am now at bro. George's and using his PC to keep in touch with you.

Also, this morning an electrician finally hooked up the 5 gallon water heater to the shower at Ernest's house. So tonight, as long as they don't turn the power or water off, I am looking forward to a hot shower!

Renee and the kids are traveling today from NC to home - so please keep them in your prayers.

Love and greetings to all.

Ted


Friday July 6 - 6:13 am (EST)

We arrived in Ghana safely and had a good trip down from Accra. There is a lot of construction at the airport and the whole process of going through immigration, collecting you bags, going through customs and exiting the airport has been streamlined and very up-to-date. I was met at the airport by a number of brothers and sisters. The plane arrived a little late - about 8:30 pm - I rode to to Tema with Dr. George Amuasi and we were at Ernest Apeadu's house by about 9:45. A number of us stayed up late talking and got to sleep sometime after midnight. For those who will be following me to Ghana in the next few weeks you are in for a pleasant surprise when you go through the airport this year.

On Thursday Ernest and I got early and had breakfast - fried eggs, bread and coffee before Ernest left for work around 6:45 am. Bro. Owusu came around 7:30 and we spent most of the day taking care of some various things that needed to be attended to. We changed a little money (the exchange rate was down a bit - 6,800 cedis to the dollar). We also stopped by the post office and I applied for a new Ghanaian drivers license (my current Ghana driver's license is valid for another year - but they are changing over to a new license and it takes about a month to get one and then it is good for 5 years.) Hopefully, I will get before I return to the States. In the meantime they gave me a temporary license that is valid until the new one is issued. We stopped by and greeting Paul Addo at his office at Tema Development Corporation (TDC) and then stopped by Christian & Lizzie Nsoah's house to greet them - but they had traveled. (It is a Ghanaian custom that you go by greet friends)

Owusu and I then picked Ernest up from his office and went to Ernest's house for lunch - boiled rice and beef stew with some coleslaw on the side (not bad for my first lunch). After lunch we took Ernest back to work and then drove to the Amuasi's house to formally greet George, his wife, Theresa and their children. Also, George provided with the antimalarial drugs that I will be taking during my stay in Ghana this year. We visited for awhile and then we had to get back to Ernest's house to get ready for evening services.

The Accra Road church has arranged for me to speak every night through Sunday. Last night we met from 6:00 - 7:30 pm and we studied "How to hold on to your faith during difficult times". It was raining in Ashaiman (and since most of the members have to walk a distance that usually means smaller crowds) but we still had a good number of people present. Traffic was heavy and the 8 mile ride from Ernest's place took around half an hour.

When we got back to Ernest's house we found the water was off (The utility company was doing some repairs and said it might be three days before they had our area back up and running) - so I took my shower out of a 5 gallon bucket of cold water. Brrrr! but after the initial shock it felt good to be clean and cool. The weather has been hot and it has rained a little everyday.

This morning there were several brethren that dropped by to see around breakfast time. Bro. Kingsley Boakye told me about a lot of the good works that are going on at Accra Road and he said that especially the radio program was having a tremendous impact on the community. He said almost every Sunday there were large numbers of visitors at services and they are baptizing people on a weekly basis. I also had a phone call from a brother in the Volta Region and he said his people were hearing the program 80 miles away and it was helping the church there. praise God for this. A special thanks to all the brethren who make it possible for the radio program to be on the air. I finally got away from the house a short time ago and am sending this email from bro. Amuasi's computer.

This afternoon bro. Owusu and I will be driving to Accra and I will be going to the U.S. Consulate to see if I can talk to them about granting a visa for Paul & Matilda Addo to return with on July 27. I am taking all their documentation along with their passports and my own letters to see if something can be done. Please remember this in your prayers. By the time I get home from Accra it will be time for evening services in Ashaiman.

Take care and God bless.
Love and greetings to all.

Ted & Owusu


Wednesday July 4 - 8:28 am (EST)

Flight was a little bumpy but arrived in London safely. Met the Camp family yesterday. Just met Bill Dillon, Mike Kiser and Ernest Underwood at the airport. It is time for us to move to the gate. Will check in when we arrive in Ghana.

God bless.

Ted


Monday July 2 - 2:06 pm (EST)

In just a few minutes Delbert will be picking me up and we will be heading for Tampa International. My flight leaves at 8:30 pm and arrives in London (Gatwick) at 10:00 am (GMT) on Tuesday. At Gatwick I will meet Loyd, Lana and Lisa Camp from Mt. Home, AR. Bill Dillon, Mike Kiser and Ernest Underwood will arrive into London early on Wednesday morning. Our connecting flight leaves London on Wednesday at 2:25 (GMT) and we are scheduled to arrive into Accra at 8:05 pm (GMT). Keep us in your prayers.


We continue to receive good reports regarding the radio program we are broadcasting in Tema. The following news comes from bro. Paul Addo:


“By God's grace the money transferred has been received and radio time for the next quarter has been purchased. The radio messages have also been received.

As a result of the radio work we receive at least 10 visitors on each Sunday and have had 3 baptisms. With regards to the listeners - I can say millions are listening to the gospel broadcast. Even those in Aburi and its surrounding towns receive the broadcast which is very encouraging. We pray that the Lord will touch the hearts of the listening public to accept the Lord, and also pray that our brethren will continue to support the radio broadcasts.

I hope to send you some photographs in the future.

Until I hear again from you it's bye for now and God bless you.”

Paul Addo, Ashaiman
ACCRA ROAD CHURCH OF CHRIST

Nathaniel Adams & Paul Addo doing a live broadcast.

 

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"Thank you", to all who encourage us, pray for us and support us in this work. As we work together - it is my prayer that God will bless our efforts richly to His glory and the saving of many souls.