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2002 campaign Graphic

Date: June 23 - July 17, 2002.

This year I will be traveling in-country with Ernest Apeadu, Paul & Matilda Addo and Edward Owusu-Ansah.

The first week—we will be staying in Tema and working in Ashaiman. The church was first established in Ashaiman in 1982. Since that time we have had the privilege of working with many fine brethren and also to see the church grow tremendously. There are now four churches in the immediate area. We are scheduled to meet on our first night with the Sebrepor church, the youngest and smallest of the Ashaiman churches. It is located just adjacent to the Michael Camp military base. A gospel meeting is then planned with the Lebanon church, one of the larger congregations in Ashaiman, which will conclude on Sunday morning. Sunday evening we will worship with Official Town church in Ashaiman.

Monday morning, July 1, we will travel to Kade in the Eastern Region where we will be working with Isaac Adjei along with brethren from Kade and surrounding churches to conduct a week of evangelism and preaching in Abaam and Abodom. During the day personal work will be conducted from house to house. Each evening we will conduct street preaching. Daniel Owusu, who was one of the fist converts in Abaam, is now preaching for the Abaam church. In spite of being hindered by being crippled in one leg, Daniel walks all over the town preaching the gospel. The work is going very and the brethren are trying to erect a meeting place. They are need of $ 500 to help them purchase materials to cast concrete blocks. Martin Oppong is preaching for the church in Abodom. He is was converted in Kade and graduated from the West Coat School of Preaching last year. Martin has been doing a fine in getting the work in Abodom well established. We will finish up the work in this area on Sunday morning.

Sunday afternoon, July 7, we will drive from Kade to Kukurumtumi and I will speak to the church at evening services. This is Paul & Matilda Addo’s hometown, a beautiful area located in the mountains/hills north of Tema and Accra. That evening we will stay in the home of Paul’s father - who is in his mid 90’s.

Monday morning, July 8, we will drive back to Tema to help bro. Edward Owusu-Ansah and his work with the churches in Kpone, Haana and Dawhenya. Monday and Tuesday we will be working with the church in Haana located on the north side of Kpone. This is a new area of development with many people moving into the area. Wednesday and Thursday we will be working with the church in Kpone. This is the oldest of the three churches and a traditional fishing area. Bro. Owusu preaches for the Kpone church. Both churches are working on church buildings and can also use some help to buy building materials. Over the weekend we will conduct an evangelistic campaign with the recently established church in Dawhenya. It is located just to the north and east of the Kpone/Haana area. Work will be done house to house during the day with public preaching each evening.

On Sunday evening, July 14, we will finish up most of our work by meeting with the Accra Road church in Ashaiman. This is the congregation that I have worked most closely with over the years. They are involved in many good works. One is the establishment of the Ashaiman Christian Centre - a school, when completed, that will provide education for children grades K - 8. (See Paul’s article on page 2.) They also conduct our Church of Christ Radio Program that airs each Sunday morning. This program is transmitted from a powerful FM station in Tema and reaches thousands of people with the gospel of Christ.

During the weeks that we are in the Tema area we will be helping with the radio work and the various building projects.

In the past few weeks we have had a number of benevolent requests from brothers and sisters needing assistance in one form or another—medical, etc. In addition there are all of the building projects that are under way—church buildings, Ashaiman Christian Centre, etc.

Following are some of our current needs:

Campaign 2002 Expenses:

Air fare: $ 1,900.00
In-country expenses: $ 1,150.00
Evangelism: $ 1,200.00

Other Expenses:

Bibles: $ 1,000.00
Bdg Projects: $ 5,000.00
Benevolence: $ 2,000.00

Two laptop computers are also needed.

Thank you for your continued prayers and support.

Ted Wheeler

CAMPAIGN 2002 TRAVEL-LOG (latest report on top)
Read from the bottom for a chronological account


Sunday, June 23, 2002

Venice

We had a wonderful Lord's Day at Venice this morning. It is Sunday afternoon and preparing to leave for the airport. This first time in 23 years that I was packed and ready to go early this morning. It was also the first time that I am not carrying over all kinds of excess luggage. Just my two allowed pieces @ 70 pounds each (and a hefty carry-on). Renee and Trisha will be taking me to the airport in just a little bit. My flight is scheduled to depart Tampa at 7:35 pm.

Thanks for your prayers and support.

Ted


Monday, June 24, 2002

Amsterdam

Flight to Ghana

After worshiping with the Venice church and saying goodbye to all the brethren there - the family and I went out for a last lunch together. After lunch, Renee and Trisha drove me to Tampa International to catch the first leg of my journey - from Tampa to Memphis. Check-in was quick and I was happy that it took just a few minutes to pass through security. For whatever reason, the person right behind me was lucky enough to get the full security check - including his shoes and hand luggage! The flight to Memphis was nice and they even gave me a can of coke and a bag of peanuts.

The layover in Memphis was really quick and before I knew I was boarding the flight for Amsterdam. They had security-checked my boarding passes and boarding the flight was really easy. An incoming flight was late so there were many empty seats on the plane. I had an aisle seat with three empty seats to my right. I had my hopes up for being able to stretch out and sleep on the 8 hour flight. But ... just before we departed a soldier headed for Kuwait boarded and joined me. We talked a little and ended up with two seats apiece. About an hour into the flight I could see he was really tired and uncomfortable so since he was headed for 4 months in the desert - I let him take all the empty seats and he slept the whole way.

In Amsterdam my departing gate was just a short walk from where I disembarked. I The next flight was scheduled to depart in two hours. I bought a bottle of water and sat at the gate and just watched people arrive for the flight. Especially all the moms who were traveling alone with their children. You know, being a mom is not easy.

Finally it came time to board and I was seated next to an elderly Ghanaian woman from Accra, named Rebecca. She was sick when I sat down and already had an air-sickness bag out. I felt sorry for her - especially thinking we were not yet off the ground and had a 7 hour flight ahead of us. But as soon as we took off she began feeling better. I shared some mints with her and we talked almost the entire way to Ghana. A very nice lady. This was another good flight and soon we were landing in Accra. I said goodbye to Rebecca as I stepped off the plane into the tropical climate of Ghana. The air was hot and thick with humidity. The plane was parked close tothe terminal - so we just walked across the tarmac and into the immigration area. It took 15 or 20minutes to clear immigration and by the time I got to the backage conveyor I could see one of my bags coming. I thought, 'what a break!' my bags are coming off first. And then I waited, and waited and waited. Everybody left and a KLM representative told me that was all the luggage and I would need to fill out a lost luggage claim. After that I cleared customs and went outside where I was met by brothers Ernest Apeadu and Edward Owusu-Ansah. 20 minutes later I was in Tema and ready for a good nights sleep.

Thank you all for you prayers and to God for the safe journey over. God bless.

Ted

PS - Upon my arrival in Tema there were some problems with phone lines and power outages which with my schedule of work did not enable me to email until now. I will try and send another tonight after services.


Tuesday June 25, 2002

Sebrepor Church of Christ

Ernest and I woke up at 5:30 am this morning. (Note: Ghana's time is 4 hours ahead of the USA.) As I started to get dressed I realized what was in the bag that had failed to arrive with me. All of my personal items (underwear, socks, etc!) It was a problem because I had just spent over a day in the clothes that I traveled in and really didn't feel like wearing them any longer. Then I remember I had a change in my carry-on that I was saving for the trip home. So that was a relief and I was hoping that my bag would arrive this evening.

Ernest works for Valco, an American owned aluminum company. Around 6:30 we left the house and dropped his son, Alvin, off at school and then I dropped Ernest off at his office so I could use the car for the morning.

Bro. Owusu-Ansah met me at Ernest's house around 8 am and then we went around a made some necessary visits and exchanged some dollars into cedis (Ghana's currency). The exchange rate is now around 8,000 cedis to the dollar. It makes things relatively affordable for those of us visiting; but makes life hard for the average Ghanaian. Especially with inflation running around 20%.

There was a World Cup 2002 soccer game scheduled and many people throughout the country took time off from work and other things to watch the game at 11:00 am (GMT). During one of our visits Owusu-Ansah and I took time to watch some of the game. It is really fun to watch soccer with the Ghanaians. They love the game and really understand it. To them (and probably most of the world) the World Cup is much much bigger than the Super Bowl is to Americans.

At 12:30 we swung and picked up Ernest and brought him home and had lunch with him. (Ernest's office is about 10 minutes from his house.) We let Ernest take his car back to the office and we used local taxis the rest of the day. You can go just about any place in Tema for 25-50 cents (USD). Toward the end of the afternoon we began preparing for evening services at the Sebrepor Church of Christ.

The weather in Ghana at this time is very hot and humid. In the 90's and the air is just thick with humidity.

At around 6:00 pm Paul Addo picked us up and drove us to Sebrepor. It is about a 20-30 minute drive depending upon traffic. The church recently moved from the schoolroom where they were meeting to their own property. We weren't quite sure where the new place was so we had to stop a couple times and see if someone knew where it was located. After about 10 minutes driving through town we found it. to fully appreciate our driving around town you need to understand thatery few streets have signs in Ghana and there are very few street lights. And in Sebrepor not all streets run straight.

Anyways we arrived a little early and were pleased to find that the church had built a very nice temporary structure. It was about the size of Venice's auditorium. Blockwork about waste high, dirt floors, wooden benches, a few fluorescent lights and a nice metal roof on supported on steel poles. A couple sisters were there early tidying up the place.

There was a nice cool breeze which was great after dealing with the heat and humidity all day. And then there were the mosquitos who must have arrived early to welcome me to Ghana. I didn't think of bringing my repellant to services and the mosquitos took advantage of my mistake.

Once we started services and I was in the front of the auditorium the mosquitos seem to have dissappeared. (Perhaps my sermon put them to sleep!) We had around 50-60 turn out for services which was very encouraging. Sebrepor is the youngest of the Ashaiman churches and their members are spread out over a wide area. Most of them walk quite a distance to services. I taught a lesson on the Blessings Of Prayer. At the end of the services two sisters requested prayers and we closed for the night.

One of my oldest friends in Ghana worships at Sebrepor, bro. Maxwell Koranteng. He used to work at the airport and was one of the first Christians I met back in 1980 on my first trip to Ghana. He promised to come visit me in the house later in the week.

Immediately after services we drove the 25 miles or so in Accra and I checked to see if my lost bag had arrived. I was very pleased when I entered the lost and found and saw it in the midst of many other unclaimed bags.

We finally arrived home around 9:30 and bumped into Charles Salmon and Jamie McCaa from Naples who had arrived earlier in the day. They will also be in Ghana for about a month.

Thanks again for your prayers.

Ted


Wednesday, June 26, 2002

Lebanon Church of Christ

Ernest woke up as usual and I again took Alvin to school, dropped Ernest off at work and met Owusu-Ansah around 8:00 am. At the same time a number of brethren dropped by the house to pickup their support and discuss various aspects of the work.

After that Owusu and I drove to Kpone to check on some of the brothers and sisters. First, we stopped at bro. Cornelius' house (he was one of the church leaders and will be helping to organize the evanglism and preaching at Haana, Kpone and Dawhenya). Unfortunately, we missed him and had to leave a message with his wife. Then we stopped by to see another brother, Joe Mensah, a very good friend of mine (and a fisherman, too!). Joe just lost his wife, Dinah. She was only about 35! I still haven't quite understood what her illness was. Joe to had traveled. He is a traditional fisherman and traveled about 80 miles west to Elmina to fish for a week or so. In his absence we met one of his young children and then went by and visited Dinah's mother and aunt. They seemed genuinely touched by our visit.

Around 11:30 we stopped by Paul Addo's office and found that a large group of his fellow workers had gathered to watch another of the World Cup games on lunch break. There was someone on the street nearby selling popcorn so I bought several bags and we watched a little of game before meeting Ernest at his home for lunch.

In the afternoon we began getting ready for the gospel meeting that would begin that evening at the Lebanon church of Christ in Ashaiman. This congregation was established in 1994 and has between 100-150 members. The church asked me to preach from the book of Philippians. So I spent a lot of the afternoon studying in Philippians. My lack of sleep over the last week finally caught up with me and I also crashed for around 90 minutes. Owusu-Ansah woke me up in time for me to get ready and leave around 5:00 pm for the Lebanon church. It is only about 8 miles from Ernest's house; but depending on traffic it can take 30-60 minutes or more to get there.

We had a nice service with about 60-70 present. Many of my old friends now worship at Lebanon and it was good to see them again. They all send their greetings to 'sister Renee', Trevor, Abena (Trisha), Troy, and the rest of you.

One sad note: a dear friend and member at Lebanon, bro. Appiah-Sackey passed away two weeks ago. It was a real blow to the church for he indeed was what we call a 'pillar of the church'. Many of the customs, especially regarding funerals, ar much different in Ghana than in the USA. In this particular situation the wife and the church had to take care of almost all the arrangements which are very involved and costive for them.

The church asked if I would attend the funeral on Saturday. (which will be held in Enyan-Denkyira some three hour drive from Tema.) I told them I would so we will be planning for that later in the week.

After services we drove back to Tema. It took quite a while to drive out of Ashaiman. Ashaiman is a very large town - perhaps 200,000 people by now. At night the streets are full of people and traffic. Very very busy. It makes 'snowbird season' in Florida look like light traffic.

Shortly after turning out the lights, the good Lord sent a wonderful rain which lasted nearly all night. It was great sleeping - listening to the rain fall on the metal roofing and feeling the cool breeze blow through the windows.

I closed my eyes again thankful for another safe and successful day, and especially for the cool rains.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Thursday-Friday, June 27-28, 2002

Thursday and Friday were very similiar to Wednesday. Wake up at 5:30 am take Alvin to school, drop Ernest at work and then meet with brethren and prepare for evening services at the Lebanon church.

Attendance continued to be good at services. Over the course of these two days plans were finalized for the funeral on Saturday for bro. Appiah-Sackey. Paul & Matilda Addo would pick Owusu-Ansah and I up at 5:00 am so that we could be in Enyan-Denkyira by 8:00 am. Just about the whole Lebanon church would also be going so they rented a couple buses to take the members on Saturday. The other churches in Ashaiman would also be sending a number of their members, too.

On Thursday, I was finally able to meet bro. (Dr.) George Amuasi after he closed from work. He seems to be doing a bit better than last year - although he still experiences periods of extreme pain. It was good to see him. He also prescribed some anti-malarial meds for me - which I hope will deal with all the mosquitos I have bumped into thusfar in my trip. I also met Theresa, George's wife, and was pleased to learn that she was running for the office of local assemblywoman. I truly believe that we need people of integrity in public office - and what better people to serve than faithful Christians. The elections come on at the end of July.

On Friday, we received word that Matilda Addo's sister was rushed to the hospital. From what I could tell it sounds like she was having convulsions - perhaps from a high fever. By late evening we learned that she was doing much better.

Please continue to remember the work and especially our travels to the funeral tomorrow.

Ted


Sunday, June 30, 2002

Ashaiman 

This morning I woke up to sound of bro. Paul Addo blowing his horn outside of Ernest's gate at 5:15 am. I had forgotten to tell anyone that I needed to get up and get ready for the radio program and overslept myself. I quickly got ready and ran out to the car barefoot and finished putting on my socks and shoes on the way to the radio station. We were scheduled to speak at 5:30 am.

We arrived in the sound studio just as they were starting introduction to our program. I was suprised to hear bro. Carl Chambers singing Amazing Grace in the background. (I had forgotten that Carl had made a recording for us and it was used regularly on the program.) From that we went right into the morning message on the Cross of Christ.

The radio program is having a great impact in Ghana. Adom FM has increased the height of their tower as well as their power. It is now reaching most areas along Ghana's southern coast. At the funeral yesterday, I was visiting with one of our brothers who is preaching in a town a short distance from Denkyira and he said they were receiving it clearly and it was a great help to the church. I also learned it is now reaching even in the Western Region. A special thanks to all of you who help support this work. The owners of Adom FM also own two other stations and have asked if we would consider expanding our broadcast onto those stations. (Of course, they want the additional income - but it would also help us reach most of the southern half of Ghana. (It would take about $ 200.00 per month to expand the program onto the two additional stations - one in Accra and one in Kumasi.)

Paul dropped me back off at Ernest's house around 6:30 am and everyone in the house was busy getting ready for worship. Ernest and I left around 8:30 and drove over to Ashaiman to finish up the meeting with the Lebanon church. We arrived to find the meeting place overflowing. There were Bible classes all over the place - inside and outside of the building. Attendance was 279 (including 98 children.). They are in the process of building a very large church building and are at the point where they are trying to put on the roof.

After services Ernest and I stopped at Paul & Matilda and watched the last 15 minutes of the World Cup Finals. The Addo house was quiet when we arrived. They were pulling for Germany and Brasil had just scored 2 goals. Owusu and Paul arrived a short time later and we went out and had lunch together.

Paul's son, Richard, and a friend picked me up for evening services. The road from the main Ashaiman road to Official town was as Ernest described it 'undescribable'. He said the potholes were 'no potholes but man holes'. It was a dirt road that has been heavily eroded by the rains and heavy trucks. We arrived at the Official Town church around 5:30 pm only to discover that the doors were locked and the services didn't start til 6:30 pm. So we drove back to the main road to check on a vehicle that was being prepared. We waited about thirty minutes and then returned back to the church building via the 'undescribable road'!

This time the building was open. And by the time serives started the building was full. Two years ago the church moved from a school building to their own property and since have constructed a very fine building. All it needs is finishing - plastering, wiring, etc. A $ 1000.00 would go a long way in helping them get this done. After services I met many of my old friends. I also met bro. Owusu, who works with Jimmie Hill in the Brong Ahafo Region. Jimmie and I went to school together at FSOP. Jimmie currently works with Truth for the World.

Ernest arrived from Accra about mid way through services and just a few minutes ago we drove back to Paul & Matilda's so I could send this last email before heading to the Eastern Region tomorrow. We will be conducting evangelistic campaigns in Abaam and Abodom near Kade. Please remember our travels and this work in your prayers.

God bless.

Ted


Monday, June 31, 2002

Trip to the Eastern Region

Bro. Owusu-Ansah and the taxi driver we hired, one Mr. Asare, arrived around 9 am. We loaded up my gear and then drove to Ashaiman to pick up Paul & Matilda Addo. Before leaving the Addo's house we prayed together that God would watch over us as we traveled and also bless the work that we were setting out to do in Abaam and Abodom in the Eastern Region.

We left Ashaiman around 10 am and headed for Kade. On the way we passed through Nsawam, home of some of Ghana's finest bakers and the roadside turkey-tail sellers. We stopped to top the fuel tank at a modern filling station and bought some minerals (soft drinks) and biscuits (cookies) - therefore we passed on the turkey tails this year. Just before leaving Nsawan we stopped and bought several loaves of bread before continuing our journey.

This area of Ghana is full of beautiful countryside - rolling hills covered with tropical foilage. About 30 minutes west of Nsawan we started noticing that the brakes were heating up with the smell of hot brakes and brake fluid. The driver also noticed that the peddle was getting soft. We stopped in a small town and pulled to the shoulder of the road and the driver went in search of a fitter (mechanic). He final came back with a young man and after inspecting everything under the hood they proceeded to pull the front wheels and inspect the system. It was decided that air was in the lines so they bled the brake system. The brake peddle hardened up and then we were on the road again. Just a 45 minute delay and an auto repair bill of around a dollar!

We passed through Boadua, where bro. Quansah preaches - then through Adonkrono, where the first scene you see as you come around a bend and climb a hill is the building for the Adonkrono church of Christ. It was all nicely painted with flowers planted all around the property.

We then drove over the small toll bridge and crossed the River Birim and were in Kade. We climbed the hill into town and then turned left in the center of town and drove to Isaac and Alice Adjei's home. We surprised to see that the road had been graded sometime in the recent past and a culvert had been installed where the road was always washed-out in the rainy season.

The entire Adjei family was home and Alice and the girls were busy pounding fufuo for our group. According to custom we all sat down in Isaac's hall (living room) and greeted Isaac's family, informed them of our mission (the reason for being with them at that time) and they in turn welcomed us. They then served cold minerals and a plate of roasted beef.

Isaac then took us to the place where we would be staying for the week - the home of bro. & sis. Nimoh. They have a nice compound house in the center of town. Again we went through the customary greetings and welcome. They provided us with two bedrooms and the use of the house. Paul & Matilda stayed in one room and Owusu, Asare and I stayed in the other room.

One thing we noticed immediately upon arriving in Kade was the incredible increase in heat, humidity and the lack of any breeze. It was like being in a giant greenhouse. The heat and humidity were thick in the air. This would be the conditions for most of the week.

Alice sooned arrived with the fufuo and we sat down and enjoyed our welcome meal. After unpacking the vehicle - we began preparing for services at Abaam - about a 30 minute drive from Kade.

Around 6:00 pm we set off for Abaam. We arrived in town to meet bro. Daniel Owusu, the local preacher, and a few of the brothers and sisters setting up the PA system in the market area along the main road through town. At 7:00 we were ready to begin the preaching nad "pop" - we blew the PA system. The brethren then spent about 30 minutes trying to fix the problem. When they realized that it would have to be sent for repairs they checked with a neighbor who just happened to have a high powered sound system that was used for parties and funerals. The guy set all the stuff up, mixers, CD changers, power amps, etc. - it looked like he was setting up for a small rock concert. About and hour later we were ready to go - and I had one of the most powerful, cleanest sounding PA systems that I have ever used.

We spoke for about and hour and then had about 30 minutes of singing before closing for the night and heading back to Kade. We got back to the Nimoh's and they had prepared hot tea for all of us with some fresh pineapple. After drinking the tea we were all awake and "warmed up". We stayed up late talking and visiting and then called it a night. They had a single bed with a foam mattress for me to sleep on and Owusu and Asare slept on foam mattresses on the floor. Again, the thing you noticed was the stillness of the air and the tropical heat and humidity. But somewhere late in the night we all passed out for the night.

God bless.

Ted


Monday, July 1, 2002

Trip to the Eastern Region

Bro. Owusu-Ansah and the taxi driver we hired, one Mr. Asare, arrived around 9 am. We loaded up my gear and then drove to Ashaiman to pick up Paul & Matilda Addo. Before leaving the Addo's house we prayed together that God would watch over us as we traveled and also bless the work that we were setting out to do in Abaam and Abodom in the Eastern Region.

We left Ashaiman around 10 am and headed for Kade. On the way we passed through Nsawam, home of some of Ghana's finest bakers and the roadside turkey-tail sellers. We stopped to top the fuel tank at a modern filling station and bought some minerals (soft drinks) and biscuits (cookies) - therefore we passed on the turkey tails this year. Just before leaving Nsawan we stopped and bought several loaves of bread before continuing our journey.

This area of Ghana is full of beautiful countryside - rolling hills covered with tropical foilage. About 30 minutes west of Nsawan we started noticing that the brakes were heating up with the smell of hot brakes and brake fluid. The driver also noticed that the peddle was getting soft. We stopped in a small town and pulled to the shoulder of the road and the driver went in search of a fitter (mechanic). He final came back with a young man and after inspecting everything under the hood they proceeded to pull the front wheels and inspect the system. It was decided that air was in the lines so they bled the brake system. The brake peddle hardened up and then we were on the road again. Just a 45 minute delay and an auto repair bill of around a dollar!

We passed through Boadua, where bro. Quansah preaches - then through Adonkrono, where the first scene you see as you come around a bend and climb a hill is the building for the Adonkrono church of Christ. It was all nicely painted with flowers planted all around the property.

We then drove over the small toll bridge and crossed the River Birim and were in Kade. We climbed the hill into town and then turned left in the center of town and drove to Isaac and Alice Adjei's home. We surprised to see that the road had been graded sometime in the recent past and a culvert had been installed where the road was always washed-out in the rainy season.

The entire Adjei family was home and Alice and the girls were busy pounding fufuo for our group. According to custom we all sat down in Isaac's hall (living room) and greeted Isaac's family, informed them of our mission (the reason for being with them at that time) and they in turn welcomed us. They then served cold minerals and a plate of roasted beef.

Isaac then took us to the place where we would be staying for the week - the home of bro. & sis. Nimoh. They have a nice compound house in the center of town. Again we went through the customary greetings and welcome. They provided us with two bedrooms and the use of the house. Paul & Matilda stayed in one room and Owusu, Asare and I stayed in the other room.

One thing we noticed immediately upon arriving in Kade was the incredible increase in heat, humidity and the lack of any breeze. It was like being in a giant greenhouse. The heat and humidity were thick in the air. This would be the conditions for most of the week.

Alice sooned arrived with the fufuo and we sat down and enjoyed our welcome meal. After unpacking the vehicle - we began preparing for services at Abaam - about a 30 minute drive from Kade.

Around 6:00 pm we set off for Abaam. We arrived in town to meet bro. Daniel Owusu, the local preacher, and a few of the brothers and sisters setting up the PA system in the market area along the main road through town. At 7:00 we were ready to begin the preaching nad "pop" - we blew the PA system. The brethren then spent about 30 minutes trying to fix the problem. When they realized that it would have to be sent for repairs they checked with a neighbor who just happened to have a high powered sound system that was used for parties and funerals. The guy set all the stuff up, mixers, CD changers, power amps, etc. - it looked like he was setting up for a small rock concert. About and hour later we were ready to go - and I had one of the most powerful, cleanest sounding PA systems that I have ever used.

We spoke for about and hour and then had about 30 minutes of singing before closing for the night and heading back to Kade. We got back to the Nimoh's and they had prepared hot tea for all of us with some fresh pineapple. After drinking the tea we were all awake and "warmed up". We stayed up late talking and visiting and then called it a night. They had a single bed with a foam mattress for me to sleep on and Owusu and Asare slept on foam mattresses on the floor. Again, the thing you noticed was the stillness of the air and the tropical heat and humidity. But somewhere late in the night we all passed out for the night.

God bless.

Ted


Tuesday, July 2, 2002

Kade, Eastern Region

Around 5:30 am we woke up to the sound of sweeping. (Every morning each household will sweep out their entire compound.) As we were drinking our morning coffee and elderly Kade sister dropped by and brought us a couple pineapples from her farm. She was one of the first members of the Kade church when it was started back in 1985. It seems like almost every year since, when we are in town, she has been dropping by with pineapples.

It is very cloudy today. The air is heavy with rain. We've had a number of visitors from surrounding churches. Around 3 pm it started to rain. Along with the rain was a gentle breeze. And with both a temporary relief from the tropical climate.

By 4 pm we are having a real tropical downpour. The rain is pouring off the roof and being collected in barrels. (We are using buckets of rain water for our showers. Tonights shower will be colder than usual.)

At 6:00 pm with no let up in the rain - the local brethren inform us that the preaching will be canceled for the night. So we spend the evening listening to the rain on the metal roofs and exchanging stories about life in Ghana / America. Later in the evening I brought out the UNO cards and a group of us played cards until late in the evening.

Finally, around 11 pm the rain let up and everyone headed to bed. I asked Owusu to take the bed and I moved to the bare concrete floor. Not very soft but much cooler than the foam bed. In addition, the landlord provided an oscillating fan. It turned out to be comfortable night for sleeping and we would keep these arrangements for the rest of the week.

God bless.

Ted


Wednesday, July 3, 2002

Abaam, Eastern Region

This morning we got up to another hot and humid day. After breakfast we had about a two hour Bible study with our driver, Mr. Asare. He worships with a local prayer group in Tema and believes on occasion that he has spoken in tongues. We studied almost the entire time from 1 Corinthians 13 & 14.

After the study, bro. Gideon Osei-Dabo, from Pramkese, dropped by and visited with us for awhile. He was on his way to take a group to Abaam to do personal work.

Today seemed even hotter than usual. The tropical sun was high and blazing in the sky causing the previous day's rain to steam up from the ground. Of course, the gentle breeze enjoyed the night before dissappeared with the rain.

Later in the afternoon, I had a message from Charles Salmon and Jamie McCaa, asking me to visit their group in Akwatia. (They were with a campaign group from Naples, FL working with bro. Quansah in Boadua.) It seems a local brother that we have helped in the past had fallen into sin and was in the process of repenting and making things right with the church. We visited with the young man for about 30 minutes counseling and encouraging to do what was right. The meeting ended very amicably. I then drove back to Kade.

At 6:00 pm we all loaded up and headed for our final night of street preaching at Abaam. This time the sound man was all set up and everything went off without a hitch. We sang for around 30 minutes, preached for an hour or so, followed by another 30 minutes or so of singing. We finished up around 9:00 pm. On the way back into Kade we stopped at a sisters kiosk, and had a cold Coke and bought 3 or four big bags of water. (It is kind of like bottle water only it is sealed in a bag about the size of a sandwich bag. There is about 20 of these bags in bigger bag.) We got home and placed most of these in a refrigerator.

The Nimoh's had once again prepared hot water for tea. We drank a cup of tea and played a few hands of UNO before getting a shower (a bucket of that cold rain water) and heading to bed.

Tonight, I was pestered with mosquitos. I would spray my feet and then they would work on my arms, I would spray my arms and then they decided to work on my neck and head. It seems like when I finally discouraged them spray it was just about time to get back up again.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Thursday, July 4, 2002

Abodom, Eastern Region

Happy 4th of July. I hope all of you had a nice holiday and were able to spend the day with family and friends.

Martin Oppong, preacher for the Abodom church, came by in the morning to finalize plans for the street preaching. Also, Edward Quansah, preacher for the Boadua church, came by and took us to see their church building. They have done a lot of work this past year and now have the building roofed and ready for plastering and a few other finishing touches. We also visited the site where the Quansah's are building their home. They are working on two rooms right now and have them up to window level.

Our group celebrated "America's Birthday" with the Nimoh family, Adjei family and Quansah in Kade. It was a nice time of fellowship.

Afterwards we all got ready to head for Abodom, a 20 minute drive from Kade. We had a nice crowd for the first night. We started around 7 pm and finished up around 9 pm.

Tonight we sprayed the room for mosquitos before going to bed. An the first few hours of sleep were mosquito free. About half way through the night a few of them slipped into the room and it was the same routine of putting on enough OFF to discourage them.

Take care and God bless, Ted

God bless.

Ted


Friday, July 5, 2002

Abodom, Eastern Region

This morning we got up and after breakfast bro. Nimoh asked if I would like to go and see his farm. He had been telling us all week about the farm. When I told him I was afraid of cows - he laughed and he said he had a big bull he wanted me to meet and pet. So we agreed and jumped in his old pickup and headed for the farm. It is located about 4 miles outside of Kade. We arrived to find that he owned about 160 acres and was farming about having it at the present time. First stop was the kraal (corral) with his 72 head of cattle and a great big bull. He jumped the fence and asked me to follow him. Inside was muddy and we had to walk carefully to reach the cattle. The bull was a monster; but acted like a pet. We pet it for a few minutes and then he took us to see his oil palms adn his palm oil extraction plant. He also showed us 16 acres that he is currently planting with citrus.

On our way back home he swung by the school (K-9) that sister Nimoh operates. When we arrived the children were outside and conducting various activities,debate, singing, etc. Two young boys sang a song they composed last year following 9-1-1 in which they sang for the world to arrest Bin Laden. After visiting with the kids for a little while bro. Nimoh showed me two beehives that they just built on some land near the school. He is anxiously waiting for some honeybees to move in. The agricutural dept. that by the end of the years the bees should find and occupy the hive.

Late in the afternoon, just before it was time to head to the street preaching, we received another tropical rainstorm and again our street preaching for the night was washed out.

We spent the evening visiting with brethren before calling it tonight. Tonight Mr. Asare decided he would take care of the mosquitos and he emptied two cans of spray into our room. We went to sleep and were not bothered with mosquitos ... until a couple of us got up in the night to use the restroom and the mosquitos took advantage of the open door. I never remember having so much trouble with mosquitos. I guess it is just the rain and the time of year. At least it was a somewhat cool night due the rain. By morning I even had to turn the fan down!

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Saturday, July 6, 2002

Abodom, Eastern Region

This morning we got up and as usual fixed coffee. (I had been preparing a cup for the Nimoh's every morning as they listened to BBC news on the shortwave radio.) One thing I failed to mention that the Nimoh's do every morning is have a morning devotion with their grandchildren. They are studying one of the books we printed years ago entitled Bible Themes. Sister Nimoh will read the lesson, bro. Nimoh will then translate into "twi" (the local language spoken in Kade) and make some comments. They will close the devo with a beautiful hymn and a prayer. When finished the kids finish their chores and get ready for school.

Gideon came by first thing in the morning and we drove to Pramkese. First stop was his father's house where we greeted his family. Then we drove over and saw the Pramkese church building. They too have now roofed their building. They have also started a school and have 5 teachers and a 150 children enrolled. On the way out of town we stopped by and saw the site where Gideon is building his home. He has the walls up and was preparing to put in the doors and window frames.

Late in the afternoon we received word that Matilda's sister passed away in Tema. The sister had lived with Paul and Matilda for a number of years and was therefore very close to them. As I already mentioned funerals are very involved and expensive. And I am sure the family will look to Paul and Matilda to carry most of the burden.

This evening we conducted our last night of street preaching in Abodom. We had a very good crowd tonight. About two minutes before I concluded my lesson the power went out throughout the entire error. Paul and I spoke as loudy as we could to finish up the preaching. It was pitch blackness. Only the candles on tables where ladies were selling bread and things could be seen. It was a clear moonless night and when you looked into the sky it seemed like you could almost touch the stars. As we were listening to the singing you cold see an occasionally shooting star streak across the sky. It was incredible night.

By God's grace 3 souls were baptized at Abodom. Studies had been going on in the day and preaching at night. In addition, Solomon Quainoo, brought 3 other students from Heritage Christian College to help do personal work today. They were all fine Christian men and we enjoyed getting to know them and work with them.

Before heading back to Kade we made final plans for the morning worship services for tomorrow. It was decided that I should worship with the Abaam church at 8 am and the Abodom church at 10 am before we departed for Kukurumtumi.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Sunday, July 7, 2002

Abodom, Eastern Region

We got up this morning ate breakfast and then packed all of our things before heading to services at Abaam.

When we arrrived in Abaam all the church was assembled and waiting for us. I think attendance was around 47. After closing we took some group photos and then departed for Abodom.

The Abodom church was also ready. Attendance there was 41. After services we took a group photo and then I met with the local leadership. We discussed their recent acquisition of land and also their need of a propane cylinder and lamp.

We then took off for Kukurumtumi. We passed through Kade and stopped at Adonkrono to take a picture of the church building. We then stopped in Boadua and said good-bye to Edward Quansah. We passed through Asamankese, Suhum, Koforidua and then finally arrived in Kukurumtumi.

First stop there was to greet Paul's father (He will be 100 in December!) After greeting him we drove to sister Matilda's family home and greeted her family who were all gathered to discuss her sister's death and the plans for the future.

Afterwards we met with Kukurumtumi church. Attendance was 67 and the singing was incredible. Finally we got back to the Addo's residence and called it a night.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Monday, July 8, 2002

Kukurumtumi to Tema & Kpone

This morning we got and were greeted by Matilda's family. Afterwards we went by to say good-bye to Paul's dad and take some pictures. Then we drove over and met with Matilda's family so that they could make further plans regarding the funeral.

We then headed back to Tema. This took us through the mountains with some very steep grades and beautiful scenery. On the way back I took the opportunity to talk again to our driver, Mr. Asare. I started reading all the names for the various churches and we were discussing the meaning of the names, the importace of the names, and who we honor with the names we use - and why is Christ not receiving the honor that only He is due since he built the church, died for it, etc. He in turned asked some different questions about the church and assured us that he would keep studying.

We arrived safely back in Tema around 1:30 pm to meet a number of "sympathizers" waiting for the Addos. (In Ghana it is a custom when someone dies for all the family, friends, church members and neighbors to drop by and visit and sympathize with the grieving family) This would go on from morning til night through Wednesday.

At 5:30 we set off for Kpone and our first night of preaching there. The church building is built on a hill within sight of the beach. There was a beautiful cool breeze blowing in from off of the ocean. What a change from the forest and heat in the Eastern Region. Attendance was around 48 or so.

This week I staying with Paul and Matilda Addo in Ashaiman, a large suburb of Tema. They have a fine Christian family and I enjoying getting to spend some time with them. It also makes it convenient for me to visit with so many of my friends in Ashaiman that I have known for so long.

God bless.

Ted


Tuesday, July 9, 2002

Kpone

This morning by 6 am visitors started to arrive to sympathize with the Addo's over the loss of Matilda's sister. This continued throughout the day.

Solomon and Suzie Quainoo came by this morning with their young son to thank me for the assistance that they have been receiving. This is another one of Ghana's customs. Even though the actual person who is helping with their support is not here - they will come and express their thanks, ask the Addos to thank me on their behalf and then ask me to return and express their thanks to their supporters. It was nice to see the family doing so well. They also expressed their thanks for the assistance that was sent to them when Solomon's mother passed away earlier in the year.

In the afternoon we drove to Kpone to visit with some of the brethren in the home of bro. Cornelius. He is one of the leaders in the church there. We returned to Tema and greeted bro. Ernest Apeadu's family. His two sister in laws, who live in Europe, have just arrived so I got to spend some time with Ernest's wife and her sisters, Felicia and Regina. All three sisters have three children - 7 of them being girls. It has been 2 or 3 years since I have seen some of them.

We then drove back to the Addo's to have dinner and get ready for our meeting with the Kpone church. Services started at 6:30 pm and our number tonight was a little larger than the night before. Following services the church had a small fellowship with me. They went out and bought a couple of crates of minerals. There is nothing like a nice ice cold Coca Cola.

The Kpone church supports the work in Haana and Dawhenya - so we will be working together throughout the week.

When we got to Paul's house we found that Matilda had prepared some watermelon and mangoes for us. We sat around and watched some news on the television before Owusu and Ernest headed for home. I stayed up a little later and worked on some of the updates from the Eastern Region before calling it a night and going to bed.

God bless.

Ted


Wednesday, July 10, 2002

Haana

This morning the visitors coming to sympathize with the Addo's over the loss of Matilda's sister began arriving as early as possible. The gate to the compound was locked so they rang the doorbell. Many of them walk from surrounding areas. Just imagine, everyone who comes wants to hear what happened, how you are doing, and what plans are being made. So Matilda has to tell the story over and over again - morning til night - with all who visit. Today though the visitors were fewer and Matilda would actually get to rest a little.

This morning we drove to Accra to do a little shopping. We took the old coast road from Tema to Accra. Traffic was slow; but light. It was nice seeing the waves crashing on the beach at Sukumono and then driving through Teshie-Nungua and into Accra. Just as you enter Accra they have built two beautiful hotels right on the beach. As soon as you drive past them you enter old Accra. While in town we were able to meet one or two old friends.

We drove back to the Addos where Matilda had taken advantage of her free time and prepared us a nice lunch. I told them I wanted to eat light this last week - but it seems like I am being over-ruled. The whole group said I am only in Ghana for 3 weeks and if I want to do any "slimming" (dieting) - I should do it while I am in the States the other 49 weeks out of the year. Paul said he told Renee that he would take good care of me - and his interpretation of that is to fatten me up and send me home "tough" (lots of weight).

We left the house around 6:30 pm, as usual, and drove to Haana to begin the preaching there. It is located between Ashaiman and Kpone. As you drive into Kpone there is a lot of open land and farms. We had to turn off the main road and start driving through the bush on a two-track dirt road. It had rained this week so there were a lot of ruts and water and mud. In several areas people had driven around the puddles and wet areas and we had to drive through the grass. We came around a corner and before Ernest could avoid it we drove into some ruts created by a heavy truck filled with waters. I rolled down my window and my side had sunk in the mud up to frame. Owusu and Ernest got out their side to inspect the situation. Owusu decided to walk to the meeting place which was about 3/4 miles deeper into the bush. While we were waiting Addo and I decided to push while Ernest tried to rock the vehicle out. After about 5 minutes we popped the car loose and were headed to the meeting place. Along the way we met Owusu coming with two or three brethren.

When we got to the meeting place we found that the temporary structure was partially roofed and the foundation laid on the new building. It was very dark and quiet there. The wind was blowing gently and the only thing you could hear were the crickets. Soon the brothers arrived with clothes baskets full of song books, a propane cylinder and a lamp. As soon as they fired up the lamp we started services. There were about 40 in attendance and we finished up as usual around 9 pm.

Back at the Addos we visited for awhile, watched some news before Ernest and Owusu headed for home. I didn't feel sleepy so I stayed up late and tried to catch up on some campaign updates, read a little and finally went to bed around 1 am. Around 2:30 am I was awakened by my friends the mosquitos - they seem to have mastered the art of finding me this year. I tried to ignore them for about half an hour and finally got up found my OFF and then the left me alone for the rest of the night.

God bless.

Ted


Thursday, July 11, 2002

Haana

Today the work in Haana continued. Some of the sisters invited us to lunch and prepared fufuo and ground nut soup for us. I think they enjoyed watching us eat as they did cooking for visitors.

In the afternoon we met with some brethren and made some final plans for the work in Dawhenya. It begins tomorrow and brethren from Kpone, Haana, Prampram and perhaps Ashaiman will join and help with personal work on Friday and Saturday. Also, a number of brethren have been by to discuss the different works and activities of the church.

We left the house at 6:30 pm, and drove to Haana for our last night of preaching there. Attendance was about 45. After services they brought Coke and Sprite and we all visited for awhile.

I've been staying up late and working on email updates and helping prepare some lessons for the radio program and this weekends activities.

God bless.

Ted


Friday, July 12, 2002

Dawhenya

Today the work begins in the smalltown of Dawhenya. It is located about 20-30 minutes east of Tema. Since the town does not have a police post - we have booked an appointment to visit the local chief - just to let him know who we are and what we are about. We are scheduled to meet with him following services on Sunday morning.

The church was established in Dawhenya several months ago through the efforts of bro. Edward Owusu-Ansah and the brethren at Kpone and Haana. At that time 8 souls were baptized into Christ. We are hoping this weekend to both encourage these new Christians in their new-found faith and also reach out to the community with the gospel of Christ.

Today, two bro's from Kpone stopped by to discuss the evangelizing of Nkyona and surrounding areas in the Volta Region. Last year we helped them send a team to establish the church. Since that time they have been able to establish a 2nd congregation in the area. They came to discuss ways in which we can continue to work together in the area. They set forth three areas in which they are seeking assistance: (1) they and others are eager to travel there each week and teach and preach but lack the resources to pay for their transportation. It is quite a distance away and takes a couple hours or so by public transportation to get there. (2) There is a local brother in Nkonya that has an interest to attend preacher training at Ho - but again support is an issue. (3) They would like for some American brethren to visit the place to help encourage these new congregations. We are scheduled to meet again on Sunday with a couple brothers from Accra who are also involved in the work.

Today was bro. Ernest Apeadu's 50th birthday. So he and his wife, Lucy, had a birthday party in his honor. It was scheduled to start at 4:00 pm. Paul, Owusu and I arrived right at 4:00 pm and nobody was to be found. After a few minutes we drove to Ernest's house and found him getting dressed. About 4:15 pm we followed Ernest to the party. Around 4:30 a few of his fellow workers arrived. By the time we were preparing to leave for the evening's work in Dawhenya there were about 7 people sitting with us.

We left for Dawhenya around 6:00 pm and arrived there around 6:45 pm. Upon our arrival we found the brethren from Kpone and Haana setting up the lights and the sound system. When I stepped out the car I heard them playing accapella music through the system. It sounded so familiar - then I realized they were using a cassette of bro. Carl Chambers & family singing hymns.

After everything was set up and operating correctly. The brothers and sisters got up and sang hymns in the Ghanaian languages of "Ga" and "Krobo". Dawhenya is a predominantly Krobo speaking area. Bro. Addo Adela arrived from Prampram, where he preaches, to do the interpretation for me. My lesson for the night was "Do I Really Want to Go to Heaven." My voice is starting to get a little tired, speaking loudly, night after night, in the evening air is starting to take it toll. About half way through the lesson my throat was getting dry and one of the sisters realizing what was going on went and found me a glass of water.

We had a very nice crowd in attendance. After the preaching the brethren sang for about another 30 minutes and then we closed with a prayer.

On the way back from Dawhenya we stopped by Ernest's party and they had just finished eating and were getting ready to cut the cake. It was about 9:30 pm. Ernest said everyone started arriving between 7-8:00 pm and they started serving the food around 8:00 pm. We stayed for a short time following the traditional cutting of the cake and singing happy birthday and then drove back to Paul's house to call it day.

God bless.

Ted


Saturday, July 13, 2002

Dawhenya

By 6:00 am visitors began arriving at Paul and Matilda's house. Some were coming to "sympathize" with sister Mat and others were coming to see me. Bro. Kingsley Boakye stopped by and expressed his desire to continue to do the Lord's work and his interest in helping in the Eastern Region - perhaps even moving there and preaching for a specific congregation. He has been getting a little help from the States - but needs a commitment of @ $ 100.00 per month to support his family. I have known Kingsley for a number of years - and he has always been active in evangelism and Bible studies.

Later in the morning we went by to see if bro. George Amuasi - but found no one was at home. We then swung by the Valco Clinic to see if he was on call this weekend - but the nurse told us he was off. George and I have been trying to see each other several times this week. Either the phones have been down, or one of us are gone when the other visits. I am sure eventually we will catch up to one another.

At 6:00 pm we all headed for the nights work at Dawhenya. The program was about the same as the night before. My lesson was on the subject of "Speaking Where The Bible Speaks". After services we had a man walk up an express an interest in becoming a Christian. He had been listening the night before. Tonight was just getting back from his farm. After a little discussion he told us that he had just stopped at the blue kiosk (a little bar) for a "tot". He said he would visit with us the following morning at services. Based on my experience with such individuals in the past - I kind of doubt that he will. But you never know. So we will pray that he will see through the haze of his "tots" and understand his need to repent and be baptized into Christ.

We stopped at a filling station on the way home and bought some soft drinks and ice cream. With that we all got ready for bed. I went online to check emails and caught Renee's mother online. We chatted for a few minutes and then she called Renee and I was able to chat with Renee and the kids a bit before going to bed. It was 1:00 am (Sunday morning) when I finally got to bed. And Paul will be waking me around 4:30 - 5:00 am to go and preach on the radio. So I have to get a little shut eye.

Take care and God bless.

Ted


Sunday, July 14, 2002

Dawhenya & Accra Rd., Ashaiman

This morning bro. Paul knocked on my door around 4:30 am. We both got up and around 5:00 am we headed to Adom FM to do the weekly radio program. The program is a live 30 minute radio broadcast. This morning Paul and I spoke on "Conversions in the Book of Acts". We use the song "Amazing Grace" as the theme music for the program and it is played at the beginning and end of each program.

Recently the radio station built a new tower on the mountains near Aburi and upgraded all their equipment. As a result the listening area has been expanded from Tema and the surrounding areas to most of southern Ghana. It comes in loud and clear in the Greater Accra, Eastern and Central Regions and is also now being heard in the Western and Volta Regions too.

We are having a very good response from the radio program. Everywhere I traveled this year I ran into individuals who were listening to the program. Many of the brethren, especially in the rural areas, told me it is opening a lot of doors for them to reach out into their communities.

Unfortunately, these new improvements did not come without cost. We were just informed that the cost per program has nearly doubled. Before leaving Ghana I did have an opportunity to speak with the sales manager. She apologized for the increases; but said with the new equipment and increased area of coverage they were forced to increase the rates. (I did find out that their rates were still about 30-40 % cheaper than some of the comparable stations in Accra which have a smaller listening audience.) Since we were one of the first groups to utilize the station they did agree to give us 15 weeks for the cost of 13 weeks.

I really feel like we need to keep this program on the air. The impact it is having for good is great. Currently we need $ 500.00 to cover the rest of this quarter's fees and then @ $100.00 per month to keep it on the air.

After the radio program Paul and I drove back to his house and had a cup of coffee before getting ready to drive to Dawhenya to meet the church. Bros. Owusu and Ernest showed up around 8:30 am and we all drove to Dawhenya. Traffic was light and we made the trip in about 20 minutes.

The church is currently meeting in an elementary school classroom. We arrived in time for Bible study. Attendance was in the mid 40's with several visitors present from the community. We learned that on Saturday two souls were baptized into Christ. Also, bro. Larbi (who recently moved to Dawhenya from Sakumuno) announced that his wife was also baptized into Christ during the week. He was overjoyed that she finally obeyed the gospel and that they would now be worshipping together at Dawhenya.

Following services we all traveled to the chief's residence to greet him; but learned that he had traveled due to a death in the family. The brethren said they would return later and meet with the chief.

On Sunday afternoon I had lunch with the Ernest, Owusu and Paul along with their families. There were 14 of us in all. It is was nice to be able to spend this time together toward the end of the campaign. All of us have been working together for 20 years or so. Such occasions give all of us to grow closer to one another and God and see how the various families are being blessed. It is our prayer that the Lord will give us many more occasions to work together in the future.

On Sunday night I worshipped with the Accra Rd. church in Ashaiman. The church was established back in 1982 and I have been working very closely with them every since that time. We arrived a little early for services and the first thing I noticed when I entered the auditorium was all the small desks and chairs that were piled up in one corner of the auditorium. The church has started a school (Ashaiman Christian Centre) and currently use the auditorium during the week for classes as they work on building the school building. On Sunday, with over 350 in attendance, all of the desks and things have to be piled up to make room for the assembly.

They are now operating 3 classes during the week. They are currently trying to pour the second story concrete floor and close in the first floor. As soon as this is done they being moving the classes into the new classrooms. They are hoping that they may be able to do this by the end of the year. All of this work is being done by hand. It saves a lot of money, involves the local church - but it also takes a lot of time. Be sure to remember this work in your prayers.

At the close of services I was able to visit with many of my old friends. It is good to see them still strong in the faith and active in the Lord's work. It is also great to see many of their children now growing into adulthood and also involved in the various works of the church.

After services we all stopped by Paul's house and had a coke and some fresh fruit (papaya, mango, pineapple, watermelon) before calling it a night. Having been up since 4:30 in the morning and only having had 3 1/2 sleep - it didn't take me long to crash tonight. Tomorrow I will have to get up and begin packing and preparing for my trip home on Tuesday.

God bless.

Ted


Monday, July 15, 2002

Tema

This morning a number of brothers arrived to say good-bye. After greeting and visiting with them - Ernest, Owusu, Paul and I drove into Accra to do a little shopping at the Arts & Cultural Centre. We drove to Accra using the "motorway" (12 miles of concrete expressway that connects Tema and Accra.) This the only expressway in Ghana.

After finding some bargains we decided to drive back to Tema using the the coast road. This road runs along the "coast" from Accra through Teshie, Nungua, Sakumuno and into Tema. Along the way you get to see many of the older sections of the towns, beaches, etc. The streets are lined with many shops, kiosks and street vendors.

When we arrived back at Paul's house I began doing some packing and decided I needed to get something sturdier than my canvass bags to travel home with. Bro. Owusu offered to give me an old footlocker and bring it tomorrow morning. We packed what we could and decided we would do the rest of the packing in the morning.

Brethren continued to arrive off and on all day to say good-bye and make last minute appeals.

Around 5:00 pm I moved back over to Ernest Apeadu's to spend the last night and say good-bye to his family. In addition to my visiting, Ernest's two sister-in-laws, Regina & Felicia, were also visiting with their 6 daughters (3 each). So the house was full and the kids were "busy". I went out and bought some ice cream and cookies for everyone to enjoy this last evening.

I was whipped tonight so I went to bed early - around 10:30 pm - while Ernest and Lucy stayed up and watched the evening news.

Take care.

Ted


Tuesday-Wednesday, July 16-17, 2002

Trip Home

I woke up early this morning - @ 4:30 am - and started getting things ready for my departure. Around 8:00 am Owusu and Paul arrived to join Ernest and I for a farewell breakfast. Ernest's wife, Lucy, prepared us a huge breakfast - which was enough to last me the entire day. The rest of the guys said it would take them to lunch! (It did take us to dinner, though.)

After breakfast we drove back to Paul's house and finished packing my two bags. During the day we visited a number of brethren and said good-bye.

Around 4:00 pm we took off to the airport to check my bags in early. I got to the airport and it just took a few minutes for me to get checked in. Hopefully this will save me time later in the evening when everyone shows up to catch their flights.

After checking in Ernest, Owusu, Paul & Matilda and I drove over to one of the local hotels and had dinner in a cafe. The service was slow - but the food was good. We all had soup and beff kebobs. After eating it was about time for me to check back in at the airport. The group dropped me off by the front door and we said good-bye till next year.

The government is working hard on the airport and the departure area is under a lot of construction. In spite of this I made it through most of the check-in procedures rather quickly. Upstairs where they were screening the hand luggage - I ended up in a long que (line). the screening process was much tighter this year. They were checking each person and each bag individually. They would not let another person or bag be checked until the previous one was completely through the process.

After clearing the screening area I then proceeded to the departure gate. At the gate I found that they were checking passports again and our boarding passes. There were even two expatriates, with jeweler's loops, inspecting everyone's passports. It looked like they were recording a lot of information in regards to some of the passports in their notebooks and it looked like they might actually be seizing some of the passports. After this it was just a short wait until we boarded the flight and took off for Amsterdam. I decided not to eat and hoped to sleep on the night flight. Unfortunately, it turned out that for one reason or another I could not sleep.

In Amsterdam I arrived in just enough time to walk to my departure gate and clear security before boarding my flight to Detroit. Again, in Amsterdam, before boarding the flight, the security was very tight. They took me aside and asked me very specific questions for about 5 minutes before getting approval from a superior to let me board the flight. We had a nice flight across the Atlantic and arrived in Detroit as scheduled.

In Detroit I landed with just an hour before I was to catch my next flight to Tampa. And I had to clear U.S. Immigration claim my luggage, clear U.S. Customs and the recheck my bags to Tampa. The line for immigrations was short and after a few questions I had my passport stamped and went to collect my baggage. It took awhile for the bags to start coming down the carousel and everybody was impatient. Finally one of my bags dropped and the carousel stopped. Then another carousel started up. Then they both were going. Finally the other one stopped just as my bagged dropped. I climbed over and grabbed it and headed for Customs. I made it through customs, rechecked my bags, ran up an escalator and then learned that my gate was at the far end of the airport. I walked as quickly as I could, using the moving walkways whenever possible, carrying my back-pack on my shoulder (bro. Owusu said my back-pack was the heaviest bag he had ever seen - he said it was heavy even when it was empty!). I arrived at the gate sweating and whipped from so much hurry - just as the flight began boarding.

I had a great flight from Detroit to Tampa and was happy to get off the flight and be met by Renee. It took just a few minutes to get my luggage and before we knew it we were headed for Venice. About halfway home I fell asleep and woke up just as we were getting off I-75 and getting to Venice. It was great to see all the family and especially to be able to worship with the brethren at mid-week Bible studies.

Thank you all for your prayers and support. I will be sending out a full report along with photos in the next week or so. God bless.

Ted


Ashaiman Christian School

 

Project Cost:
$ 80,000

Expenditures to Date:
$ 12,600


Classes: Currently we are using the church building and have three classes in session with 50 students (See photo). There are a number of other children registered to begin classes as soon as we can complete the building and have room for the classes to meet. The school is in need of classroom materials - pencils, pens, paper, notebooks, chalk, crayons, etc. (Due to security reasons and weight restrictions we will be trying to purchase these items in-country this year. TW)

Construction Status: Currently we are in the process of pouring the concrete floor for the 2nd level. All of this work is being done by hand. The concrete is all mixed by hand on the ground, then it is shoveled into head-pans and buckets and carried up to the 2nd level and poured out. (Imagine all the yards of concrete that is being moved! This is back breaking work and time consuming; but saves hundreds of dollars. TW) For the last several weeks the work has temporarily been at a standstill while the church tries to put together funds to purchase more cement, sand, stone, lumber and iron rods.

We thank everyone who has helped in this project and ask that you continue to remember us in your prayers. Thank you for helping us to help the children.

Paul Addo


Eastern Region ... An Area of Opportunity

 

 

Martin Oppong, recent graduate from the West Coast School of Preaching in Takoradi and preacher for the church in Abodom. We will be spending a week in Kade. During this time we will be working with the churches in Abodom and Abaam (where Daniel Owusu preaches). Churches throughout the area will be helping in this effort.

 

 

 

 

 

Ted with the congregation in Twumusu following a Sunday morning service.

 

 

 

Ted


Juju ...

Ted and Gideon Osei-Dabo, who preaches for the Pramkese church in the Eastern Region near Kade. In the bottom center of the picture you will see a number of items displayed on the ground. These are items that were given to Ted from a fetish priestess who recently was converted and gave up the practice of juju. (The voodoo that we know in this part of the world finds its roots in West African juju.) All of these items have a special significance in the practice of juju. The bodua (goats tail) is used to drive away unwanted spirits; the bansere (leather talisman) was worn around the waist for protection; the aduro kukuo (broken pot) was used to mix potions; the black powder in the moto toa (round red leather cup) was used for establishing/sealing a covenant between the fetish and the one seeking help; nyame akuma, “the axe of God” (sharpened stones) used to curse enemies; odii aba, (odii seeds) are used for cures, etc. Also, you see Gideon accepting a new Bible from Ted to be given to the former priestess to help her in her new walk with Christ.

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"Thank you", to all who encourage us, pray for us and support us in this work. As we work together - it is my prayer that God will bless our efforts richly to His glory and the saving of many souls.